Archive for November, 2015

Explore Women’s Stories During Native American Heritage Month

November 18th, 2015

6264064421_3570b656fc_oFrom the very beginning of their history, from before the arrival of European explorers to after the westward expansion of American settlers, women have played an important role in Native culture, helping to lead and cultivate their Tribe’s unique society and influencing the future of America as well. November is officially designated as National Native American Heritage Month.

Sacagawea, arguably the most famous Native woman, became a symbol of America itself. There may be more monuments dedicated to Sacagawea (also spelled Sakakawea and Sacajawea) than to any other American woman. History embraces the story of the teenager with the baby on her back who led men across a dangerous, unknown continent. Susan B. Anthony cited Sacajawea in 1905 as an example of why women should be allowed to vote. More recently, a golden dollar coin was issued in her honor in 2000.

Beyond Sacagawea, Native women have contributed to all aspects of American society. Warriors like One Who Walks With Stars and Minnie Hollow Wood – who both fought at the Battle of Little Big Horn – and leaders like Glory of the Morning, Chief of the Hocak Nation and Queen Anne, Chief of the Pamunkey Tribe, fought for the continued existence of their Tribes and their way of life. Artists and storytellers like basket weaver Carrie Bethel and potter Vera Chino shared the beauty of their people’s lives and stories. In addition, women like Fidelia Fielding, the last native speaker of the Mohegan-Pequot language, passed down their knowledge.

More recently, Native women have continued the in the roles of their foremothers while also branching out into new roles such as being advocates for Indian Country and working to promote their interest at the federal level.

Whether it was as leaders, warriors, teachers or artists, Native women have contributed to the world around them. Today, countless women carry on the traditions of their foremothers, working to honor and preserve their Native heritage and continuing to help shape America.

Thanksgiving Holiday – One Woman’s Crusade

November 18th, 2015

sarahjhaleAfter enjoying the uniquely American holiday of Thanksgiving, consider how it was the result of one woman’s determination to unify America around a shared heritage.

Sarah Josepha Hale, a writer and the editor of a popular women’s magazine, Godey’s Ladies Book, was born on a New Hampshire farm in 1788. Her most lasting contribution to American culture was her tireless lobbying for a national day of thanks.  Hale published numerous editorials urging several American presidents to nationalize the celebration of Thanksgiving.  A New England resident, Hale had always celebrated Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving had been deeply entwined in the New England culture and tradition since the 17th century, and she thought it was important for everyone to celebrate it.  Hale’s persistence paid off when in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring Thanksgiving a national holiday.

Hale was a homemaker who turned to writing to support herself and her five children after the death of her husband in 1822. Hale achieved modest success with her first novel called Northwood; A Tale of New England. Northwood lovingly described a traditional New England Thanksgiving feast that included everything from the table arrangements to details of the food. “The roasted turkey took precedence on this occasion being placed at the head of the table; and well did it become its lordly station, sending forth the rich odour of is savoury stuffing, and finely covered with the frost of the basting.” Following Northwood’s success, Hale was solicited to become the editor of a new magazine aimed at women.

In 1836, Louis Godey convinced Hale to become the editor of his magazine Godey’s Lady’s Book. Godey’s reached a wide audience and covered topics ranging from health, beauty, cooking, gardening, and architecture. Godey’s Lady’s Book was one of the most influential magazines of the 19th century. Hale used her position as editor-in-chief to campaign for the establishment of a national day of Thanksgiving.  She wrote editorials and articles about the holiday and she lobbied state and federal officials to designate an annual, national day of thanks on the last Thursday of November, a measure which she believed would ease growing tensions between the North and South on the eve the Civil War. Her efforts paid off: by 1854, more than 30 states and U.S. territories had established Thanksgiving celebrations. In 1871, she launched a further crusade to have the national Thanksgiving Day proclaimed not by the President but by an act of Congress. Decades after her death, Congress passed a bill establishing that Thanksgiving would occur annually on the fourth Thursday of November. And on November 26, 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the bill into law.

Learn about the origin of the holiday and our Mother of Thanksgiving, Sarah Josepha Hale, who lobbied to make Thanksgiving a national holiday that we all enjoy.

Saluting General Wilma Vaught – NWHM Board Member Receives Honorary Doctorate after Veterans Day

November 18th, 2015

The National Graduate School of Quality Management (NGS) Board of Trustees recently announced that Brigadier General Wilma L. Vaught would be awarded the College’s highest honor – the Honorary Doctorate Degree of Letters in recognition of her life-long accomplishments in service to our country and as an advocate for education. This is only the fifth time in the College’s 22-year history that the Board has awarded its Honorary Doctorate. The award was presented at a ceremony November 12, 2015.

Gen. Vaught joined the U.S. military in 1957, before women were fully integrated into the command structure. Women’s enrollment was capped at 2% of the forces, and they were not allowed to command men, a situation that changed in 1967. She was the first woman to deploy with an Air Force bomber wing. She was promoted to brigadier general in 1980, and when she retired five years later, she was only one of seven female generals or admirals in all the armed forces.

Brigadier General Wilma L. Vaught, USAF (Ret.) is President of the Board of Directors of the Women In Military Service For America Memorial Foundation, Inc. She is a valued member of the NWHM’s Board of Trustees.

Interested in General Vaught’s story? Watch “A New Order: Women in the Military” https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXaqdQe8eghjoWIznZYlL6ovfaZVA72Vi

Find the Women Scavenger Hunt at the National Air and Space Museum

November 4th, 2015

Saturday, November 7, 2015
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum
600 Independence Ave SW, DC, DC

NWHM will host a scavenger hunt at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. Participants will be given clues and a guide to find the places in the museum that feature women and their contributions. The scavenger hunt will be followed by an optional discussion in the museum’s food court. Meet at 10 a.m. in front of the Golden Age of Flight exhibit room on the first floor. The activity coordinator will remain at the Golden Age of Flight until 10:30 a.m., in case of late arrivals.

This is a family friendly event and both men and women are encouraged to attend. Bring your smart phone for a more interactive experience; however, paper forms will be available as well. To register go to http://nwhm.ticketleap.com/find-the-women-scavenger-hunt-at-national-air-and-space-museum/

National Women’s History Museum Launches Suffrage Resource Center

November 3rd, 2015

Chronicles U.S. Women Campaign to Win the Vote

Alexandria, VA – The National Women’s History Museum (NWHM) launched a one-stop interactive center on November 2 featuring multiple resources that chronicle the history and crusade by women in the United States for the right to vote.

Crusade for the Vote: Woman Suffrage Resource Center offers a comprehensive location online for history enthusiasts, educators and curious researchers to learn about the 72-year campaign to gain women equal voting rights. Visitors can access primary, secondary and interactive sources at www.nwhm.org. In addition, listen to experts discuss this significant moment in U.S. history on the Museum’s YouTube page. To watch, click here.

As attention for the new movie Suffragette shines a spotlight on the efforts of British women to win the right to vote, we are reminded that the campaign in the U.S. was a long and tenuous battle. While the first woman to vote was recorded as early as 1756, women did not earn universal suffrage until 1920. The campaign has been described as the longest, bloodless battle. While some students may be familiar with the stalwarts of the campaign like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Ida B. Wells and Susan B. Anthony, there are dozens of other women like Emma DeVoe, Josephine Ruffin and others whose stories remain unknown.

“We know this is an important point in U.S. history but often women’s history is told in a very limited scope,” said NWHM Director of Programs Elizabeth Maurer. “Our goal in launching and offering Crusade for the Vote is to expand access to important historical resources and to help researchers understand the story in a comprehensive way.”

NWHM has chronicled this rich history through an all-inclusive source that features primary and secondary resources. From images to articles, biographies, and lesson plans, Crusade for the Vote: Woman Suffrage Resource Center is a one-stop shop to increase awareness about this pivotal moment in U.S. history. It traces the suffrage movement from the early colonial period through passage of the 19th Amendment. To access any of the resources, visitors can go to www.nwhm.org.

Based online, the Center is easy for students, parents, and teachers to navigate but also has broad interest for amateur researchers. Crusade for the Vote is a five-year initiative for the Museum. New resources will be added monthly leading to the 100th anniversary of passage of the 19th Amendment.

To learn more about the U.S. women suffrage campaign and the NWHM click here.

 

About the National Women’s History Museum

Founded in 1996, the National Women’s History Museum (NWHM, Inc.) is a nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to educating the general public about the diverse historic contributions of women and raising awareness about the critical need for a national women’s history museum in our nation’s capital. Currently located online at www.nwhm.org, the Museum’s goal is to build a world-class, permanent museum on or near the National Mall that will herald and display the collective history of American women. A Congressional Commission has been established that is charged with producing a feasible plan, which would include the governance, fundraising, location and organizational structure of the museum. For additional information visit NWHM.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Media inquiries:

For press inquiries, please contact Melissa Williams, NWHM communications manager, mwilliams@nwhm.org or 703-416-1920.