Archive for December, 2015

NWHM Finds Americans Have A Lot To Learn About Women’s History

December 28th, 2015

Majority of Americans admit they need help brushing up on their women’s history; notable men more recognizable over female counterparts.

 

December 28, 2015
Melissa Williams, 703-461-1920
mwilliams@nwhm.org

 

WASHINGTON, DC – A recent survey of more than 1,000 Americans reveal that the vast majority of us are more familiar with our nation’s heroes, than our heroines. Commissioned by the National Women’s History Museum, the survey results indicate that less than one in four Americans can name the accomplishments of Elizabeth Blackwell, Ida B. Wells or Sybil Ludington, whereas more than three quarters of respondents are familiar with the achievements of Neil Armstrong, Frederick Douglass and Paul Revere.

- The survey further revealed that more Americans feel more knowledgeable about sports and celebrity gossip than women’s history.
- Less than 1 percent of Americans know how many women currently serve in Congress or how many women are currently a CEO of a Fortune 500 company.
- Only a third of millennials believe they are knowledgeable about women’s history, and just 10 percent of adults over age 55 feel the same way.

“Three-quarters of the people that the Museum surveyed feel that today’s museums are overlooking women’s contributions,” said Susan Whiting, Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Women’s History Museum and a longtime C-suite executive. “We know that there are many untold examples of women’s contribution to our American history, and the Museum will serve as a vital center to gather and illuminate those powerful stories. Time and again, research has proven that female role models – heroines – are powerful motivators in women’s personal and professional lives.”

Ms. Whiting’s lineage traces back to Susan B. Anthony, a cousin on her mother’s side, who was a national icon in the woman suffrage movement.

More than 80 percent of the people the Museum surveyed feel it is important to build a women’s history museum to communicate the breadth of women’s experiences and accomplishments. Once built, the Museum will be the first in the nation to show the full scope of the history of women, and will set the standard for how women’s contributions should occupy a prominent place in national discussions.

“I invite you to help the Museum at this critical point in their journey by simply emailing or writing your Member of Congress, and saying ‘I want a National Women’s History Museum,’” said Ms. Whiting. “Share the survey results with your Member of Congress and tell them that you want to see a National Women’s History Museum on or near the National Mall. You can do this through our website – www.americasheroines.org.”

Earlier this year, Congress appointed an 8-person Commission to study the potential cost, impact and location of the Museum. The Commission, the first of its kind to be privately funded, is seeking public input on a national women’s history museum and will release its findings to legislators in the next 12 months.

 

 

About the National Women’s History Museum
Founded in 1996, the National Women’s History Museum (NWHM, Inc.) is a nonpartisan, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to educating the general public about the diverse historic contributions of women and raising awareness about the critical need for a national women’s history museum in our nation’s capital. Currently located online at www.nwhm.org, the Museum’s goal is to build a world-class, permanent museum on or near the National Mall that will herald and display the collective history of American women. A Congressional Commission has been established that is charged with producing a feasible plan, which would include the governance, fundraising, location and organizational structure of the museum. For additional information visit NWHM.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

About the Survey

The data points referenced above come from a study commissioned by the National Women’s History Museum, conducted by research firm Edelman Berland as an online survey of n=1,001 adults nationwide, ages 18+. Interviewing took place from August 5-10, 2015. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percent.

 

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WMH DC 2016

December 14th, 2015

WMH_evite DC 16

 

For more information, visit nwhm.org/womenmakinghistory

Nobel Prize Day on December 10 by Considering Women’s Roles in Peace

December 2nd, 2015

Throughout human history, women have rarely instigated conflicts, but rather they often been active in their resolution. Their status as women and the gender roles assigned by culture and society influence how women work towards peace and stability. In radically different areas and time periods, women have used similar methods to achieve peace.

The first American woman to be recognized with the Nobel Peace Prize was Jane Addams, founder of Hull-House and a leading peace activist during and after World War I. Addams was determined to rid the world of war. Starting in 1906 she lectured, wrote, and advocated for ideals of peace. In January, 1915, she accepted the chairmanship of the Women’s Peace Party, an American organization, and four months later the presidency of the International Congress of Women. Addams’ outspoken pacifism and refusal to endorse World War I or the U.S. entry into it, earned her public condemnation. The woman who had been celebrated for her social work legacy serving the poor in urban Chicago, would be publicly excoriated for her opposition to U.S. participation in armed conflict. Addams remained stalwart in the face of criticism and in 1931 she was honored with the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Nobel Committee’s citation stated:

From this social work, often carried on among people of different nationalities, it was for her only a natural step to the cause of peace. She has now been its faithful spokesman for nearly a quarter of a century. Little by little, through no attempt to draw attention by her work but simply through the patient self-sacrifice and quiet ardor which she devoted to it, she won an eminent place in the love and esteem of her people. She became the leading woman in the nation, one might almost say its leading citizen. Consequently, the fact that she took a stand for the ideal of peace was of special significance; since millions of men and women looked up to her, she could give a new strength to that ideal among the American people.

Jody Williams is the last American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Williams was honored in 1997 for her work to ban landmines through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which shared the Peace Prize with her that year. At that time, she became the 10th woman – and third American woman – in its almost 100-year history to receive the Prize. Since her protests of the Vietnam War, she has been a life-long advocate of freedom, self-determination and human and civil rights.

Like others who have seen the ravages of war, she is an outspoken peace activist who struggles to reclaim the real meaning of peace – a concept which goes far beyond the absence of armed conflict and is defined by human security, not national security. Williams believes that working for peace is not for the faint of heart. It requires dogged persistence and a commitment to sustainable peace, built on environmental justice and meeting the basic needs of the majority of people on our planet.

On March 19, 2015, Williams spoke on women in Peace and Conflict at the George Washington University as part of National Women’s History Museum’s forum series “Initiating Change/Adapting to Change.” She was joined by Dr. Wendy E. Chmielewski, the George R. Cooley Curator at the Swarthmore College Peace Collection and the pre-eminent expert in 19th-century U.S. women’s peace movements.

 

Watch the program on YouTube during National Human Rights Month at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWbx1rN6-HI&list=PLXaqdQe8eghiwp22JBJVBlBSY1laK-5G4