Archive for the ‘All Events’ Category

Nov. 14th – Our “de Pizan Honors” Gala Lives On…

November 14th, 2012

NWHM would like to thank Pamela’s Punch blog for posting this wonderful account of her experience at NWHM’s de Pizan gala on Nov. 14th. Click here to read the article.

Lecture on Nov. 7th- “Woman-Made Women: American Designers, Taste, and Mid-Century Culture”

November 2nd, 2012

The National Women’s History Museum and The Wilson Center

invite you to a lecture in the series:

The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History

“Woman-Made Women: American Designers, Taste, and Mid-Century Culture”

Dr. Kathy Peiss

University of Pennsylvania

Wednesday, November 7, 2012– Lecture, 4-5:30 p.m. – Flom Auditorium, 6th Floor

Reception, 5:30-6 p.m., Sixth Floor Dining Room

Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC 20004

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested.

Please respond with acceptances only to swinston@nwhm.org

Please allow time to go through building security.

Directions to the Wilson Center are available at: www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

Oct. 25th – A Star-Studded Affair at NWHM’s LA Event

November 1st, 2012

Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Dolores Huerta, Joan Wages

NWHM and its Los Angeles Regional Council hosted their first event at Creative Artists Agency on the evening of Thursday, October 25, 2012.  The private reception celebrated the work of Dolores Huerta, Co-founder of United Farm Workers and President of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, who was recently awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor bestowed on a citizen, and Jennifer Siebel Newsom, writer, director and producer of critically-acclaimed documentary Miss Representation and Founder and CEO of MissRepresentation.org and Girls Club Entertainment.

Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Kate Walsh, Dolores Huerta

The evening also featured new musical artist Sheléa and NWHM President and CEO Joan Wages. Catherine Hardwicke, who directed the NWHM public service announcement (PSA), presented the full version. It is now available on the NWHM website and YouTube channel.  It was a fabulous event, attended by 250 VIP guests including Geena Davis, Marie Royce, Ford Roosevelt, and Frances Fisher.  The evening was made possible by Title Sponsor QVC; Presenting Sponsors Claremont Graduate University and Dermalogica; Gold Sponsors Southern California Gas Company and Rainbow Light; and Silver Sponsor The Beverly Hilton Hotel.

Click here to read a great review of the event!

“Marriage ‘Crisis’ In the Jazz Age:” A Lecture by Dr. Nancy Cott on October 24, 2012

October 15th, 2012

The National Women’s History Museum and The Wilson Center

invite you to a lecture in the series:

The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History

“Marriage ‘Crisis’ in the Jazz Age”

Dr. Nancy Cott

Harvard University

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 – Lecture, 4-5:30 p.m. – Flom Auditorium, 6th Floor

Reception, 5:30-6 p.m., Sixth Floor Dining Room

Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC 20004

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested.

Please respond with acceptances only to swinston@nwhm.org

Please allow time to go through building security.

Directions to the Wilson Center are available at: www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

Purchase Tickets for the 2012 de Pizan Gala

September 19th, 2012

Click here to purchase your ticket to the National Women’s History Museum’s 2nd Annual De Pizan Honors Gala on November 14, 2012.

NWHM Launches its Fall Lecture Series with a talk from Smithsonian’s Dr. Richard Kurin

September 7th, 2012

The National Women’s History Museum continues its “Past, Present and Future of U.S. Women’s History” lecture series at the Woodrow Wilson Center this fall with a lecture on September 19 from Dr. Richard Kurin on his new book “MadCap May: Mistress of Myth, Men and Hope.” Dr. Kurin is the current Under Secretary for History, Art and Culture at the Smithsonian. His book, which will be released on September 4th, explores the life story of the outrageous May Yohe (1866-1938), a popular entertainer of humble American origins who charmed her way to international acclaim despite tragic losses.

Eleanor Clift, contributing editor at Newsweek and The DailyBeast, will interview Dr. Kurin on his book on Sept 19th at the Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th floor Flom Auditorium from 4-5:30pm. The talk will be followed by a reception from 5:30-6pm. The event is free and open to the public.

May Yohe was a popular entertainer from humble American origins who married and then abandoned a wealthy English Lord who owned the fabled Hope diamond–one of the most valuable objects in the world and now exhibited at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. May was a romantic who had numerous lovers and at least three husbands–though the tabloids rumored twelve.  One included the playboy son of the Mayor of New York. May separated from him–twice–and cared for her next husband, a South African war hero and invalid whom she later shot.Crossing paths with Ethel Barrymore, Boris Karloff, Oscar Hammerstein, Teddy Roosevelt, Consuelo Vanderbilt, and the Prince of Wales, May Yohe was a foul-mouthed, sweet-voiced showgirl who drew both the praise and rebuke of Nobel laureate George Bernard Shaw. Nicknamed “Madcap May,” she was a favorite of the press. In later years she faced several maternity claims and a law suit which she won.  She was hospitalized in an insane asylum and escaped. She ran a rubber plantation in Singapore, a hotel in New Hampshire, and a chicken farm in Los Angeles. When all else failed, she washed floors in a Seattle shipyard, and during the Depression held a job as a government clerk. Shortly before her death, she fought, successfully, to regain her lost U.S. citizenship.

Please join us for this fascinating lecture:

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 – Lecture, 4-5:30 p.m. – Flom Auditorium, 6th Floor

Reception, 5:30-6 p.m., Sixth Floor Dining Room

Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC 20004

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested.

Please respond with acceptances only to swinston@nwhm.org

Please allow time to go through building security.

Directions to the Wilson Center are available at: www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

NWHM Ventures into Volunteerism

July 27th, 2012

Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain love for one another. (Erma Bombeck)

So far, it’s been a busy summer at NWHM.  We have been working diligently on our Congressional legislation and on creating new online exhibits. But perhaps the most exciting development has been the creation of a volunteer structure for the Museum. Many of our members and friends have asked what they can do for the Museum. Until recently, these requests outweighed our ability to handle them. That was until we met the fabulous Joanie Moser.

Joanie joined NWHM as our volunteer Volunteer Coordinator in May. Her passion for women’s history stems from meeting a fantastic, inspiring women in 1973 who marched in the 1913 Suffrage parade in Washington, D.C. Joanie was a Volunteer Director for a local Red Cross Chapter. She brings enthusiasm, a passion for the Museum’s mission and a great sense of humor to NWHM and we are grateful and ecstatic to have her.

Would you like to get more involved with the Museum? We have a number of volunteer opportunities available whether you live in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area or anywhere else in the nation.  Some of these include: promoting the Museum in your community, organizing local membership drives, holding or sponsoring a fundraising event, assisting at an event in your area, writing or researching educational material, writing lesson plans for online exhibits, calling TV stations to get our public service ads on TV and assisting with general office tasks in our Virginia office.

Volunteers are absolutely essential for the success of building our Museum and education programs. If you want to donate your time toward making a permanent home for women’s history in our nation’s capital, please follow this link below to the volunteer page on our website. You will find another link to our volunteer application at the end of the second paragraph. Once we have received your completed form, we will contact you right away to discuss your interests.

NWHM Volunteer Page

Make helping tell American women’s stories part of your story!

Happy 40th Birthday, Title IX!

June 22nd, 2012

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. — 20 U.S.C. §1681

This short sentence, signed into law by President Richard Nixon on June 23, 1972, changed history for American women (and men). It is known as Title IX. An amendment to the education section of Civil Rights Act of 1964, it is commonly believed to apply only to equal opportunities for women in high school and college sports.  But it is meant to prevent all forms of gender discrimination in all schools which receive federal funding.

After its passage, President Nixon charged the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) to define the parameters of Title IX. The resulting ten key areas covered by the law are:

  • Educational Access
  • Athletics
  • Career Education
  • Education for Parenting and Pregnant Students
  • Employment
  • Learning Environment
  • Math and Science
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Standardized Testing
  • Technology
  • The legislation was the brainchild of Representatives Edith Green (Oregon), Patsy Mink (Hawaii) and Senator Birch Bayh (Indiana).  While there are still strides to be made in educational equality, here are a few “before and after” statistics about Title IX from Title IX: Working to Ensure Gender Equity in Education from the National Coalition for Women & Girls in Education (NCWGE):

    • Participation in organized sports by high school girls has increased ten times in 40 years. Involvement of women in collegiate sports has increased six fold.
    • PhDs for women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) increased from 11% of the total in 1972 to 40% by 2006.
    • The majority of Bachelors and Masters degrees are now earned by women.

    To learn more about Title IX, including criticisms, triumphs and the work that still needs to be done, we highly recommend the following two articles:

    Title IX: Working to Ensure Gender Equity in Education

    Faces of Title IX

    Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison and Newsman Sam Donaldson Speak at NWHM Event

    June 14th, 2012

    The lovely McLean, Virginia home of Lynne and Greg O’Brien was the setting for a NWHM event last night with special guests former ABC news anchor Sam Donaldson and Texas Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison. Co-hosted by Linda and Joe Jenckes and Charlotte and Bob Kettler, the get-together was a chance for about ninety guests to get to know NWHM over a glass of wine and some hors d’oeuvres on a perfectly warm and breezy evening.

    Sam Donaldson spoke briefly about witnessing the rise of women in the news media over his forty-five-year career. While the first African-American reporters were hired in the 1960s, it wasn’t until the 1970s that women were given a chance to pursue on-air reporting careers. Reporters such as Jessica Savitch, Kathleen Sullivan and Ann Compton and a tenacious Barbara Walters worked their way from “the ground up”. Donaldson spoke highly of the skill and professionalism of women such as Diane Sawyer and Cokie Roberts. He amused guests with the story that Katie Couric claims he jumped up on a desk and sang “KKKatie, Beautiful  Katie” to her when she was a script girl. He praised the fact that now half of the on-air news personalities are women. In addition, he said that he tells his male journalism students that they must work twice as hard to match the quality and drive of today’s aspiring female reporters. In closing, Donaldson lent his support to the goal of building the National Women’s History Museum on the National Mall in Washington, DC. Read the rest of this entry »

    Come “Rock the Mall” With The Girl Scout’s on June 9, 2012

    March 27th, 2012

    “200,000 girls and adults from around the world are expected to come together on June 9, 2012 for the world’s largest Sing-Along.”

    Since the movement was founded in 1912,  Girl Scouts have used songs to celebrate life, to bridge cultural boundaries and to communicate their commitment to the principles that guide the movement. On June 9, 2012 girls from across the country will gather on the National Mall  and use the power of music to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Girl Scouting.

     

    What is the event?
    A gathering of Girl Scout friends, family and alumni of all ages. This could be one of the world’s biggest sing-alongs ever!

    When does it start?
    Preshow: 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.  
    Main event: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
    Where does it happen?
    The National Mall in Washington, DC at the base of the Washington Monument, with the stage located at 17th and Constitution.