NWHM Capitol Hearing Covered by Washington Post

December 12th, 2013

The Washington Post featured a great article about NWHM’s Capitol hearing yesterday.

National Women’s History Museum gains traction; bill would launch exploratory panel

At a House Administration Committee hearing Wednesday morning, Reps. Carolyn B. Maloney (D-N.Y.) and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) presented their bipartisan bill to launch an exploratory commission on building a National Women’s History Museum, an effort that has been ongoing for almost 20 years.

The theme of the day was “sisterhood trumps party lines,” as every speaker ran down the alternately distressing (less than 5 percent of the 2,400 National Historic Landmarks in the United States recognize the achievements of women) to empowering (women outnumber men in college enrollment) statistics as proof that women are owed Mall real estate.

The two biggest obstacles, aside from the slow grind of government, are financial and logistical: Where will the money come from, and where will the museum go?

Joan Wages, president and chief executive of the National Women’s History Museum, says she believes the museum can be funded entirely through private donations. She expected that “half the nation’s population and the other half who love their mothers” would be able to raise the $400 million to $500 million estimated cost of constructing a museum, along with a $15 million to $20 million yearly operating budget.

Wages said that, in determining location, “it comes down to, where will the most people visit it? Where will it have the greatest impact?” Which means the museum must be “on or very, very close to the national Mall.”

Committee Chairman Candice S. Miller (R-Mich.) presided over the hearing, calling the museum an “important and, I think, frankly long overdue acknowledgment of women’s accomplishments” in American history.

“Sometimes, people think we can’t work together,” Miller said. “We know, as women, that we can work together.”

NWHM President & CEO, Joan Wages, Testifies at Capitol Hearing

December 11th, 2013

If you were unable to join us on December 11, 2013 at the House Administration Committee hearing on “Establishing a Commission to Study the Potential Creation of a National Women’s History Museum,” you can view the video footage below from the testimony or by clicking here. (Skip to the 32nd minute to begin watching the testimony.)

Video streaming by Ustream

NWHM to Testify at Capitol Hearing on Women’s History Museum

December 9th, 2013

We are delighted to announce that the House Administration Committee will hold a hearing on “Establishing a Commission to Study the Potential Creation of a National Women’s History Museum” on Wednesday, December 11 at 10:30am EST.  This is the first time that NWHM has been invited to testify.

House Bill Sponsors Representatives Carolyn Maloney and Marsha Blackburn will testify about the need for the Museum. NWHM President & CEO Joan Wages has also been invited to testify.

To those who will be (or are able to be) in the Washington, D.C. area, we would be honored to have you join us.  The hearing will be held in the House Administration Committee hearing room, which is 1310 of the Longworth House Office Building.

Of course, should you be unable to join us in person, you can follow the hearing via webcast by going to the Committee website and clicking on the link to the webcast. Thank you for your continuing support of our mission. Together, we WILL succeed in honoring all of the women who have shaped this great nation by providing them the home they so richly deserve.


Historical Women Who Rocked: Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971)

December 4th, 2013

Margaret Bourke-White was born in New York. She completed her undergraduate education at Cornell University in 1927 and was an original staff member of Fortune and Life magazines. She became the first western photographer allowed to photograph inside the Soviet Union and covered the invasion of the Soviet Union by the German Army as well as the Italian Liberation. In 1945, she accompanied United States troops as they liberated Buchenwald Concentration Camp. She covered Gandhi’s campaign of non-violence in India and apartheid in South Africa. Since her death in 1971, her photographic works have been used by the United States Postal Service as postage stamps and her life as been portrayed on television and on the movie screen.

Happy Thanksgiving from NWHM!

November 26th, 2013

We hope you’ll take a moment to watch this special video that explores the origin of  Thanksgiving and the work of Sarah Josepha Hale, the “Mother of Thanksgiving,” in establishing it!

Gobble, Gobble!

Historical Women Who Rocked: Ruby Bridges

November 19th, 2013

At just 6-years old young Ruby Bridges became the face of school integration.

Ruby Bridges was born on September 8, 1954. She was born to Lucille and Abon Bridges, who had four other children, giving Ruby three brothers and one sister. At age two, Ruby and her family moved from Tylertown, Mississippi, where her family had been sharecroppers, to New Orleans, Louisiana, because her parents sought better work opportunities.

In New Orleans, Ruby went to a segregated kindergarten. However, the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled in 1954, the year that Ruby was born, that all schools must desegregate.   The decision was made in the case of Brown vs. the Topeka Board of Education, when the parents of another grade-school girl, Linda Brown, sued the school system of Topeka, Kansas, because Linda had to attend an all-black school outside of the neighborhood where she lived.

The law was put into place in Louisiana at the beginning of Ruby’s first grade year. Ruby and five other African-American girls were given the opportunity to attend a school made up of only Caucasians, after they passed psychological and educational tests. Ruby’s parents were faced with a critical decision.

For this reason, Lucille wanted to send Ruby to the new school. Lucille wanted to give her daughter the opportunities she never had, but Abon, Ruby’s father, was not eager to send Ruby to the new school because he did not want to endanger his family. Over time, though, Lucille convinced Abon that sending Ruby to the new school would be the best thing to do. Read the rest of this entry »

#FoodieFriday: A 1950s Housewife’s Guide to Grocery Shopping

November 15th, 2013

This week’s #FoodieFriday takes us back to the 1950s and more specifically to an educational video that instructs women on how to shop for their families. This type of video would probably have been shown in a home economics class. Do you remember watching videos like these when you were growing up?

#ThrowbackThursday: Nellie Bly’s Investigative Journalism

November 14th, 2013

By: Emily McAfee, NWHM Intern

Elizabeth Jane Cochrane, known as “Nellie Bly,” reached international celebrity status when she traveled around the world by ship, train and burro in 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, ahead of the fictional hero of Jules Verne’s popular book “Around the World in Eighty Days.” Her journey began today in 1889.

Bly’s big break, though, came two years before her round-the-world trip, when she faked insanity to study an asylum from the perspective of a patient. After months of rejection from editors on the basis of her sex, Bly received the opportunity to investigate the insane asylum from the New York World. Jean Marie Lutes, a scholar of women journalists, argues that Bly’s success with this story was, in part, due to her “female-ness.” Lutes suggests that because Bly was a woman, and therefore already outside the traditional image of a “reporter” in 1887, she was able to go beyond the limits of traditional reporting for her story:

“Bly’s reportage exulted in the concrete specifics of one individual’s experience and scorned the relative abstraction of disinterested observation. By adopting the hysteric’s hyperfemale, hyperexpressive body, she created her own story and claimed the right to tell it in her own way. Moreover, impersonating insanity allowed her to flaunt the very characteristics that were being used to bar women from city newsrooms: her female-ness, her emotional expressiveness, her physical—even her explicitly sexual—vulnerability.” (1)

On the basis of her diversity—by virtue of being, as a woman, an outsider to the profession—Bly was able to generate huge success. Her success was not just a personal achievement. Bly changed the field of reporting entirely with her innovative investigative techniques, and paved the way for important works of investigative journalism in the early 20th Century: for example, Ida Tarbell’s The History of the Standard Oil Company (1904) and Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle (1906). Nellie Bly’s career is a powerful example of how diversity in the workplace can strengthen a business (or, in this case, an entire profession) in unexpected ways.

Click here to read more about Nellie Bly.

(1) Lutes, Jean Marie. “Into the Madhouse with Nellie Bly: Girl Stunt Reporting in Late Nineteenth-Century America.” American Quarterly, Vol. 54, No. 2 (June 2002). Page 218. Emphasis added.

“To Flatten A Heroine: Artist Puts Disney Princess Filter On 10 Real Life Female Role Models”

November 8th, 2013

Check out his interesting spin on the “Disney Princess!” Read the original article here.

October 31, 2013 by
David Trumble_ Women Of The World Collection

Compliments of an invaluable introduction by WYSK Melissa Wardy, Women You Should Know had a chance to speak with David Trumble, an award-winning artist, cartoonist and illustrator about his prototype for Disney’s new “World of Women” collection. First unveiled in a May 2013 Huffington Post Parents blog, it features his princessified versions of ten of the world’s most inspiring women from past and present history. We love why he did it.

In addition to generously allowing Women You Should Know to run his original “World of Women” art, David also shared with us his reasons for drawing the thought-provoking cartoon, which he collaborated on, in part, with educational psychologist Lori Day. Here’s what he had to say (before & after images of each woman below).

“This was a response to the furor kicked up over the glossy ‘princessification’ of Pixar’s Merida character, both in image and doll form. I drew this picture because I wanted to analyze how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mold, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same homogenized plastic smile.

So that was my intent, to demonstrate how ridiculous it is to paint an entire gender of heroes with one superficial brush. “My experience of female role models both in culture and in life has shown me that there is no mold for what makes someone a role model, and the whole point of Merida was that she was a step in the right direction, providing girls with an alternative kind of princess. Then they took two steps back, and painted her with the same glossy brush as the rest. So I decided to take 10 real-life female role models, from diverse experiences and backgrounds, and filter them through the Disney princess assembly line.

“The result was this cartoon, which earned equal parts praise and ire from readers. Some didn’t get the joke, some disagreed with it, others saw no harm in it at all and wanted to buy the doll versions of them… it was a polarizing image, but I suppose that’s the point. The statement I wanted to make was that it makes no sense to put these real-life women into one limited template, so why then are we doing it to our fictitious heroines?

“Fiction is the lens through which young children first perceive role models, so we have a responsibility to provide them with a diverse and eclectic selection of female archetypes. Now, I’m not even saying that girls shouldn’t have princesses in their lives, the archetype in and of itself is not innately wrong, but there should be more options to choose from. So that was my intent, to demonstrate how ridiculous it is to paint an entire gender of heroes with one superficial brush.

“But that’s just me.” – David Trumble


David’s Disney Princessified “World of Women”

1) RUTH BADER GINSBERG PRINCESS

Read the rest of this entry »

#FoodieFriday: Fast-Food Chain Invents ‘Burger Mask’ For Women?

November 8th, 2013

Read the original MSN article here.

8/11/2013 8:30:00 AM
MSN NZ
The new Liberation wrapper (Freshness Burger / fbkorea)
The new Liberation wrapper (Freshness Burger / fbkorea)

A fast food restaurant chain has created a new face mask for Japanese women to use when eating one of their burgers to avoid a cultural faux pas.

In Japan, it is regarded as attractive to have what’s known as “ochobo’ – a small and modest mouth – and doing the opposite, such as eating a large meal, is frowned upon as rude and ugly.

So much so that one Japanese fast food chain, Freshness Burger, found their sales were plummeting because female customers did not want to be seen with their open mouths in public.

Freshness Burger, however, has create a simple solution called The Liberation Wrapper and sales have gone through the roof.

This wrapper is a paper napkin which holds the burger and covers the mouth with a picture of a polite smile.

But behind the napkin, the female customer can happily eat their burger without committing a social sin.

Dentsu East Japan, the company hired to come up with The Liberation Wrapper told the The Daily Mail “Their (Freshness Burger) largest and best-tasting Classic Burger was amongst the least chosen by their female customers.

“One of the major reasons seems to relate to Japanese manner…. It is good manner to cover their mouth when they have to largely open up their mouth [to eat].

“Our female customers had a frustration of not being able to do it.

“Freshness Burger decided to challenge convention, freeing women from the spell of Ochobo mouth.”

The company said sales have soared 213 per cent in just one month since introducing it.