NWHM First But Not Last Lesson Plan

Content Area/Online Exhibit:First But Not Last: Women Who Ran for President

Grade Level: Secondary Grades

Lesson Prepared By: Jessie Regunberg

 

 

Description/Purpose

 

Students will learn about the brave women who dared to run for president in the United States, and they will be given a taste of the democratic process by participating in a mock election.

 

Time:

One class period.

 

Prerequisites:

 

  • None

 

Materials:

 

  • Computer Lab…access to First But Not Last...
    If a computer lab is not available, the teachers can print the Online Exhibit.  Please note that the Online Exhibit is very long -- double sided copying is encouraged.
  • Handout. [Available for download here].

Procedures:

 

Introduce the subject by asking the class if they knew that there have been several women before Hillary Clinton who ran for president.  Explain that today they will be voting to elect one of the women featured in the Online Exhibit as President of the United States.

Pass out the voting handouts [click here to download].  This handout will act as both a ballot and as a navigation tool for the Online Exhibit First But Not Last.  After giving the students sufficient time to read about the candidates, have them vote for their top three choices.  Bring the class back together and collect their ballots.  Tally up the points for the result and write the winners on the board.  Discuss why these women were chosen.

 

 

           

 

Standard(s):

 

NCSS

 

I-d Culture: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity, so that the learner can compare and analyze societal patterns for preserving and transmitting culture while adapting to environmental or social change.

 

II-b Time, Continuity and Change: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity.

 

IV-e Individual Development and Identity: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity, so that the learner can examine the interactions of ethnic, national, or cultural influences in specific situations or events

 

V-f Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions, so that the learner can identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity

 

IX-g Global Connections: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global connections and interdependence, so that the learner can describe and evaluate the role of international and multinational organizations in the global arena.

 

 

NCTE

 

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

 

7. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, as well as posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

 

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).