Women in Industry Heading

 

   


Endnotes:

(1) Thomas Dublin, Women at Work (New York: Columbia University Press, 1979), 93.
(2) Thomas Dublin, Transforming Women’s Work (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994), 29; see also Sarah M. Evans, Born for Liberty: A History of Women in America (New York: Free Press Paperbacks, 1997), 114-115.
(3) Evans 121.
(4) Dublin Transforming Women’s Work 72.
(5) Benita Eisler, The Lowell Offering (New York:  J.P. Lippincott Company, 1977) 13; see also Dublin Transforming Women’s Work 29.
(6) Lynn Y. Weiner, From Working Girl to Working Mother (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1985) 15.
(7) Evans 133.
(8) Ibid 82.
(9) Dublin Transforming Women’s Work 88; see also Evans 81-82.
(10) Evans 81-82.
(11) Weiner 15; see also Dublin, Transforming Women’s Work 88-89.
(12) Dublin Transforming Women’s Work 208, 211.
(13) Evans 86; see also Dublin Transforming Women’s Work 36-37.
(14) Dublin, Transforming Women’s Work 159.
(15) Evans 114-115, 134; see also Dublin, Transforming Women’s Work 159.

(16) Cynthia Shelton, “The Role of Labor in Early Industrialization:  Philadelphia, 1787-1837,” in Journal of the Early Republic, (1984: 4/4), 377.
(17) Evans 86; see also Robyn Muncy, Lecture:  “Women in the Progressive Era Labor Movement,” University of Maryland, College Park, 13 Sept. 2005.
(18) Dublin, Women at Work 104-105.
(19) Evans 83.
(20) Dublin, Women at Work 89.
(21) Dublin, Women at Work 98.
(22) Ibid 108.
(23) Evans 115.

(24) Tera W. Hunter, To ‘Joy My Freedom:  Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War (Cambridge:  Harvard University Press, 1997), 74-98.
(25) Robyn Muncy, lecture, “Women and Progressive Reform,” 6 Sept. 2005.
(26) Sarah M. Evans, Born for Liberty (New York: Simon and Shuster, 1979), 130; see also Teresa Amott, Race, Gender, and Work (Boston: South End Press, 1996), 166.
(27) Amott 135; see also Lynn Y. Weiner, From Working Girl to Working Mother (Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 1994), 87.
(28)Amott, 48, 158, 220.
(29) Evans 131.
(30) Amott 158; see also Thomas Dublin Transforming Women’s Work (Ithaca:  Cornell University Press, 1985), 238.
(31) Tera W. Hunter, To ‘Joy My Freedom:  Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War (Cambridge:  Harvard University Press, 1997), 111.
(32) Weiner 29; see also Amott 125, 264.
(33) Margaret Walsh, “Women Outworkers in Industrializing America in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries,” Labor History Review [Great Britain] 56/2 (1991): 20.
(34) Hunter 224-27.
(35) Robyn Muncy, Lecture, “Women in the Progressive-Era Struggle for racial Justice,” 20 Sept. 2005.
(36) Ibid.
(37) Weiner 87-88.
(38) Walsh 18.
(39) Annelise Orleck, Common Sense and a Little Fire (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995), 23-30.
(40) Orleck
(41) Dublin Transforming Women’s Work 29; see also Amott 207.
(42) Hunter 116-18.
(43) Orleck 32-34.
(44) Orleck 34.
(45) Weiner 67.
(46) Susan Levine, “Labor’s True Woman:  Domesticity and Equal Rights in the Knights of Labor,” The Journal of American History 1983 (70/2): 327.
(47) Ibid 337.
(48) Ibid 325, 330.
(49) Orleck 53-55.
(50) Orleck 77.
(51) Ibid.
(52) Orleck 43.
(53) The Women of Summer, dir. Suzanne Bauman and Rita Heller, 58 minutes, Filmmakers Library, 1985, videocassette. 
(54) Alice Kessler-Harris, Out to Work:  A History of Wage-Earning Women in the United States (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982) 116.
(55) Ibid; see also Weiner 24-29.
(56) Robyn Muncy, Lecture, “Women in the Progressive Era Labor Movement,” 20 Sept 2005.
(57) Weiner 29.
(58) Hunter, 112.
(59) Alice Kessler-Harris, Out to Work: A History of Wage-Earning Women in the United States (New York:  Oxford University Press, 1982), 259-260.
(60) Susan Ware, Holding Their Own:  American Women in the 1930s (Boston:  Twayne Publishers, 1982), 32.
(61) Kessler-Harris, 270-271.
(62) Ware, 8-11.
(63)Kessler-Harris, 251.
(64) Ibid, 253.
(65) Ware, 28.
(66) Muncy, Lecture, “Women in Local Protests:  Consumers, Workers, and Citizens,” 25 Oct. 2005; see also Muncy, Lecture, “Women in the Struggle for Racial Justice,” 27 Oct. 2005.
(67) Ibid. xiv, 41; see also  Robyn Muncy, Lecture, “Progressive Reform in the New Deal Era,” 11 Oct. 2005.
(68) Kessler-Harris, 258.
(69) Ware, 39.
(70) Muncy, Lecture, “Progressive Reform in the New Deal Era,” 11 Oct. 2005.
(71) Orleck 165.
(72) Muncy, Lecture, “Women in the New Deal Labor Movement,” 13 Oct. 2005.
(73) Teresa Amott, Race, Gender, and Work (Boston:  South End Press, 1996), 172.
(75) Kessler-Harris 262.
(76) Ware 30, 38.
(77) Kessler-Harris 269.
(78) Muncy, Lecture, 25 Oct. 2005.
(79) Ware 48.
(80) Ibid.
(81) Sharon Hartman Strom, “’We’re no Kitty Foyles’:  Organizing Office Workers for the Congress of Industrial Organizations,” Women, Work, and Protest, Ed. Ruth Milkman (Boston:  Routledge, Kegan & Paul, 1985.
(82) Kessler-Harris 275.
(83) National Women's History Museum, "Partners in Winning the War: Women in World War II" Exhibition, Annandale, Virginia, 2004.
(84) Kessler-Harris 279.
(85) Dorothy Sue Cobble, The Other Women’s Movement:  Workplace Justice and Social Rights in Modern America (Princeton, NJ:  Princeton University Press, 2004), 17.
(86) Cobble 19-20.


Thanks to NWHM Fall 2005 Intern Laura McComb-DiPesa for researching and writing the text for this exhibition
as well as for finding several of the images. Web design and other photo research by Holly Kearl.

 

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